Sigma Chi Principles

Sigma Chi's Purpose

"Believing that many advantages are to be derived from a secret fraternity organization; appreciating that closer communion of kindred hearts which adds so many incentives to virtuous exertion; and feeling that in union there is strength: We do hereby form ourselves into an association for the development of the nobler powers of the mind, the finer feelings of the heart, and for the promotion of friendship and congeniality of feeling."

- The Founders of Sigma Chi, Preamble to the Constitution of 1856

"The purpose of this Fraternity shall be to cultivate and maintain the high ideals of friendship, justice, and learning upon which Sigma Chi was founded."

- Article II of the Modern Sigma Chi Constitution

Principles

The Jordan Standard, Sigma Chi Creed and Spirit of Sigma Chi are some of the basic guiding principles of this fraternity. The Jordan Standard is our general standard for judging whether a man is worthy of entrance into our brotherhood. The Creed is a statement of members' beliefs and ideals. The Spirit captures the drive behind our fraternity's founding and is based on thoughts of frienship.

The Jordan Standard

The confidence of the Founders of Sigma Chi was based upon a belief that the principles which they professed and the ideal of the Fraternity which they sought were but imperfectly realized in the organizations by which they were surrounded.

The standard which the Fraternity started was declared by Isaac M. Jordan to be that of admitting no man to membership in Sigma Chi who is not believe to be:

A Man of Good Character ...
A Student of Fair Ability ...
With Ambitious Purposes ...
A Congenial Disposition ...
Possessed of Good Morals ...
Having a High Sense of Honor and
A Deep Sense of Personal Responsibility

The Sigma Chi Creed

The Sigma Chi Creed expresses the beliefs and ideals of all of the members of Sigma Chi. It is a statement of what we believe our code of conduct should be and how we should lead our lives. The purpose of the Creed, however, as stated by its author George Ade, is "not [to] restrain a brother from being a free agent and a lively comrade" but instead lays down some basic goals that can be attained.

I believe in fairness, decency and good manners. I will endeavor to retain the spirit of youth. I will try to make my college, the Sigma Chi Fraternity, and my own chapter more honored by all men and women and more beloved and honestly respected by our own brothers. I say these words in all sincerity; that Sigma Chi has given me favor and distinction; that the bond of our fellowship is reciprocal, that I will endeavor to so build myself and so conduct myself that I will ever be a credit to our Fraternity.

The Spirit of Sigma Chi

The Spirit of Sigma Chi, as conceived by the Founders more than 140 years ago yet visible and alive today, is based on the theory that ...

... Friendship among members, sharing a common belief in an ideal, ...
... and possessing different temperaments, talents, and convictions, ...
... is superior to friendship among members having the same temperaments, talents, and convictions, and that ...
... Genuine friendship can be maintained without surrendering the principle of individuality or sacrificing one's personal judgment.